our perfect angel



Duh

  • Son: Well that was easy.
  • Mom: What was easy?
  • Son: I was having a staring contest with a tree.

two perfect angels…

Yes, our little one now has an older brother. They get along like they’ve been in the same family their whole lives: bicker all the time, but overall are happy they have a constant playmate. 

"You don’t want to eat Lava Girl because she will burn you up!" - Our son

"You don’t want to eat Lava Girl because she will burn you up!" - Our son

Mom, when you were little, did you used to see a lot of dinosaurs?
Of course our son would draw the intersex child… you should see the others too: a mini drag queen and a girl with a penis.

Of course our son would draw the intersex child… you should see the others too: a mini drag queen and a girl with a penis.

t day

Dad: I’m going to work tomorrow [Wednesday], but I’m not going early. I won’t leave until after you get on the bus. 

Son: But you’re going to miss all the fun!

Dad: I’m not going to miss any fun. What do you mean?

Son: We are going to eat lots of turkey. 

What’s just so great about this conversation is that this will be the first Thanksgiving that our son has ever celebrated. He has no idea what to expect other than what he’s gleaned from TV (which he still doesn’t know we’ve gotten rid of — see previous post). We met him about one year ago, the day after Thanksgiving in 2011. And we’ve been giving thanks ever since. 

Mommy, after breakfast, can I have a pie?
Why didn’t I just bring home Scooby Doo? [son disappointed in dad trying to do voices in the bedtime story “Magnus at the Fire.”]
We thought we’d do a little experiment today: let our son watch TV for as long as he wants. He got up this morning at 8 a.m., and has been watching ever since. It’s now 3:45 p.m. I’d love it if this screen shot included all his day’s “viewing activity,” but with 32 episodes so far, I can’t fit it all on the screen. (Here’s a partial shot though, and the list is growing with the passage of time.) We’ve also both left the house twice: once for several hours (to go running and to Zumba), and the other just now to get some coffee. 
Evidence that he has no idea how much time has passed is when we went upstairs to take him his afternoon pill. He takes the same pill in the morning, and another at 2:30 p.m. We handed it to him and he said, “I already took it.” Yep, like six hours ago…
In the meantime, we’ve cancelled Netflix, deactivated all devices, and changed the password. Turns out doing all that is not instant fix – it takes about eight hours for the system to catch up. So, in the meantime, our son is getting his last hurrah. After tonight, the TV is going into a box in the basement. 
Are we horrible parents? I’m sure that in a few days after experiencing withdrawal, our son will certainly think so. But the kid has no ability to entertain himself, engage in imaginary play, or self-soothe. It’s time he develop these skills. I know adults who do nothing but watch television, and they are quite dull with no drive to live life in a meaningful way. So, horrible parents? I think the opposite. 

We thought we’d do a little experiment today: let our son watch TV for as long as he wants. He got up this morning at 8 a.m., and has been watching ever since. It’s now 3:45 p.m. I’d love it if this screen shot included all his day’s “viewing activity,” but with 32 episodes so far, I can’t fit it all on the screen. (Here’s a partial shot though, and the list is growing with the passage of time.) We’ve also both left the house twice: once for several hours (to go running and to Zumba), and the other just now to get some coffee. 

Evidence that he has no idea how much time has passed is when we went upstairs to take him his afternoon pill. He takes the same pill in the morning, and another at 2:30 p.m. We handed it to him and he said, “I already took it.” Yep, like six hours ago…

In the meantime, we’ve cancelled Netflix, deactivated all devices, and changed the password. Turns out doing all that is not instant fix – it takes about eight hours for the system to catch up. So, in the meantime, our son is getting his last hurrah. After tonight, the TV is going into a box in the basement. 

Are we horrible parents? I’m sure that in a few days after experiencing withdrawal, our son will certainly think so. But the kid has no ability to entertain himself, engage in imaginary play, or self-soothe. It’s time he develop these skills. I know adults who do nothing but watch television, and they are quite dull with no drive to live life in a meaningful way. So, horrible parents? I think the opposite. 

We asked our son to hang up his bathing suit. This is what happened.

We asked our son to hang up his bathing suit. This is what happened.